What is your #1 question about composting?

3 stage compost pile

We’ve all had them. And I really want to know. You compost now, but it might not be going so well. Or you know that composting is one of the easiest things you can do to save the world, but don’t know how to get started. Or you have been composting for years but you wanted to know if… You get the idea. Vermicomposting questions are also fair game.

I am going to answer one of the top questions on this blog before the end of the month. Other top questions will be considered for future composting posts. A real answer to your problem from a Master Composter. So ask away. Ask your question by submitting a comment. Please formulate your question carefully and remember simple and clear is better.

Because of the plethora of spam comments we’ve been getting lately, if it appears as though you have never looked at our website, www.backyardecosystem.com, or your question is not relevant to composting (for this post anyway), the comment will be treated as spam.

Comment Rules: Remember what Fonzie was like? Cool. That’s how we’re gonna be — cool. Critical is fine, but if you’re rude, we’ll delete your stuff. Please do not put your URL in the comment text and please use your PERSONAL name or initials and not your business name, as the latter comes off like spam. Have fun and thanks for adding to the conversation! (Thanks to Brian Oberkirch and Tim Ferris for the inspiration regarding user-friendly comment rules)

7 Comments on “What is your #1 question about composting?

  1. What is the benefit of having a compost bin over just a pile? I ask because it seems like it would be easier to turn a pile than compost in a bin.

    What are the benefits/downsides of keeping a compost pile in a relatively sunny area versus a relatively shady area and why?

  2. We are having issues with rodents. Is there anything we can do to deter them?

    • Great question Jamie.

      The best answer for all pests is make sure there are plenty of browns in the pile. The rodents are after the greens, especially the kitchen scraps. If they are well mixed in with browns half the battle is already over.

      Wet and mix (turn the pile) to get things going. Once it starts composting rodents should lose interest.

      Then cover the pile with a weighted tarp if you have an open pile or an open topped enclosure. Limiting access will limit problems.

  3. Kevin, are coffee grounds a green or a brown? Is it worth the trouble of collecting coffee grounds from a local cafe to supplement my compost piles of mostly leaves, straw and kitchen scraps? If the grounds will help speed up the composting process, I’m in! (The piles and I live in northern Montana, where we’re frozen for one-third of the year.)

    • Like most things from the kitchen, coffee grounds are high in nitrogen, and therefore a green. Yes, do collect them from a cafe to add to your pile. You might be surprised at how much goes on in the heart of your pile even midwinter.

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Remember what Fonzie was like? Cool. That's how we're gonna be — cool. Critical is fine, but if you're rude, we'll delete your stuff. Please do not put your URL in the comment text and please use your PERSONAL name or initials and not your business name, as the latter comes off like spam. Have fun and thanks for adding to the conversation! (Thanks to Brian Oberkirch and Tim Ferris for the inspiration regarding user-friendly comment rules)

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